Fondazione De Benedetti Cherasco 1547 Onlus

Logo Fondazione

1796 armistice

Other

Napoleonic itineraries in Piedmont

On the 9th of March Napoleon, just two days after having married Josephine Tascher de La Pagerie, widow of Beauharnais (official and victim of the guillotine of the revolution), left for Italy to command nearly 38.000 poorly equipped men.

 

He thus gave start to a military operation that, in the plans of the “Director”, should have been a simple maneuver of “diversion”. The Austrian attack was supposed to arrive from the Rhine Army.

 

So began the first Italian Campaign which brought to light the military and political genius of General Bonaparte, who, despite his numeric disadvantage managed to repeatedly defeat the Austrian and Piedmontese forces.

 

Numerous were the battles in Dego, Millesimo, Cairo Montenotte, Cosseria and at San Michele Mondově where the historic battle of April 19 1796 called the "Battle of Bicocca of San Giacomo" or "The Taking of San Michele".

 

With the Armistice of Cherasco, signed April 28 1796, Napoleon forced Vittorio Amedeo III of Savoia to make heavy concessions.

 

The ratification of the Peace of Paris on the 15th of May, assigned both Savoy and Nice to France.

 

On the 10th of May 1796 the final Austrian defense collapsed at the Bridge of Lodi and on the 15th of May that same year he entered into Milan.

 

And with this the first phase of the Italian Campaign ended.

 

While waiting for his next assignment, to be even richer with glory, Giuseppe Bagetti, the “captain-engineer-geographer-artist” of the French army as early as 1796-97, revisited the sites of the first Napoleonic campaign in Italy, creating a series of views, drawings and watercolors that, with their geographic precision, illustrate the most important moments that the French General and his Army had lived.

 

These works were a true reportage, after the fact. They were intended to exalt the values of the Napoleonic Army and its commander.

Napoleonic itineraries in Piedmont

On the 9th of March Napoleon, just two days after having married Josephine Tascher de La Pagerie, widow of Beauharnais (official and victim of the guillotine of the revolution), left for Italy to command nearly 38.000 poorly equipped men.

 

He thus gave start to a military operation that, in the plans of the “Director”, should have been a simple maneuver of “diversion”. The Austrian attack was supposed to arrive from the Rhine Army.

 

So began the first Italian Campaign which brought to light the military and political genius of General Bonaparte, who, despite his numeric disadvantage managed to repeatedly defeat the Austrian and Piedmontese forces.

 

Numerous were the battles in Dego, Millesimo, Cairo Montenotte, Cosseria and at San Michele Mondově where the historic battle of April 19 1796 called the "Battle of Bicocca of San Giacomo" or "The Taking of San Michele".

 

With the Armistice of Cherasco, signed April 28 1796, Napoleon forced Vittorio Amedeo III of Savoia to make heavy concessions.

 

The ratification of the Peace of Paris on the 15th of May, assigned both Savoy and Nice to France.

 

On the 10th of May 1796 the final Austrian defense collapsed at the Bridge of Lodi and on the 15th of May that same year he entered into Milan.

 

And with this the first phase of the Italian Campaign ended.

 

While waiting for his next assignment, to be even richer with glory, Giuseppe Bagetti, the “captain-engineer-geographer-artist” of the French army as early as 1796-97, revisited the sites of the first Napoleonic campaign in Italy, creating a series of views, drawings and watercolors that, with their geographic precision, illustrate the most important moments that the French General and his Army had lived.

 

These works were a true reportage, after the fact. They were intended to exalt the values of the Napoleonic Army and its commander.

Other details

Fondazione De Benedetti Cherasco 1547 Onlus - P.Iva 97627090018 - Powered by Alexmedia © 2009